Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome – Dr Joy de Gruy Leary

The Sojourner Truth show (Margaret Prescod) on http://www.kpfk.org covered Dr. Joy de Gruy Leary and this discussion which is a fundamental part of our history, present and future. Not only black people, but whites have been affected and infected as Dr. de Gruy states with slavery in the United States.

This discussion touches deeply the direct and indirect trauma African chattel slavery has had on our generations. How do we, how can we ‘completely’ be made free of the remnants of post-traumatic slavery syndrome?

First key is Self Love – Black people must love themselves, ourselves before anyone else could open their hearts & minds to our sole being.

Second key is Education – The clouded history taught in American classrooms are full of lies with so many gaps in the people that made this country.

Third key is Acknowledgement – To no longer mask the truth about the lives which were forced upon these lands along with the lives taken. The lives which set the soil, the lives which built the railroads, the lives which fed the said ‘settlers’ who are truly terrorists children, the lives which kept homes clean, the lives forgotten.

Those are a few things if were practiced could help in bringing a conscious to America – to help in removing the facade this country has been existing under for centuries.

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Juneteenth

Juneteenth

To this day, we still have a caste system… Across the world, the hunger for control over people has plagued many communities. From here in the states to Egypt to Palestine & any land where man finds monetary gain as his number one goal.
My ancestors built this country, but the white oppressors did not break their backs.

Via Pulitzer Winner & Author of The Warmth of Other Suns Isabel Wilkerson:
On this day, June 19, 1865 — two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation — word finally reached the last of the enslaved people that “all slaves are free.” Union General Gordon Granger read these words from the balcony of the former Confederate Army headquarters in Galveston, Texas, 80 miles west of the Louisiana line.

There are several theories as to the two-and-a-half year delay that left slaves in Texas toiling for under the lash for so much longer than they should have. One theory is that a messenger had been killed on the way to read the Proclamation. Another is that slave owners purposely withheld the news (which would have been all too easy in the days before the technology we now take for granted).

In the end, it took 2,000 union troops to capture the state to enforce the law. Only then could General Gordon read the Proclamation stating that the enslaved people were now to be employees rather than property. The reactions among the newly freed people ranged from shock to jubilation. Some stayed to see what employment would mean. Others left the plantations immediately and set out to find family members spread out over the region.

Slavery was quickly replaced with sharecropping and a Jim Crow caste system that would hold formerly enslaved people and their descendants in the grip of a brutal new social order which millions would ultimately flee.

Here in this photo, survivors of slavery soberly observe Juneteenth in their hats, canes and bonnets in Austin, TX, 1900. In the early years, the newly freed people and their descendants took pains to dress up for Juneteenth, as laws had forbidden slaves to do so in certain jurisdictions, even in the rare instances when owners would have been so inclined to provide them with decent clothing.

Juneteenth has been a state holiday in Texas since 1980, and has long been celebrated in California, where many Texans journeyed during the Great Migration. Now, a total of 42 states and the District of Columbia recognize it as a state holiday or special day of observance. Celebrations now often include parades, storytelling, barbecue and red soda pop, prayer and recognition of the elders. And the building from which General Granger read the Proclamation all those years late is now a historic landmark.

Happy Freedom Day to everyone, in honor of the last enslaved Americans to be set free…..

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Dr Joy DeGruy: Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome Full Lecture

Heard Dr Joy DeGruy on http://www.kpfk.org this morning and enjoyed hearing the wisdom and truth spilled from such an intelligent Black Woman.

PLEASE SHARE THIS KNOWLEDGE WITH YOUR CHILDREN, YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY. The truth about the slavery here in the United States has been shed from history books.

http://joydegruy.com/

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Ebony and Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America’s Elite Colleges

The new book 10 years in the making, that examines how many major U.S. universities — Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Dartmouth, Rutgers, Williams and the University of North Carolina, among others — are drenched in the sweat, and sometimes the blood, of Africans brought to the United States as slaves. In “Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology American history professor Craig Steven Wilder reveals how the slave economy and higher education grew up together. “When you think about the colonial world, until the American Revolution, there is only one college in the South, William & Mary … The other eight colleges were all Northern schools, and they’re actually located in key sites, for the most part, of the merchant economy where the slave traders had come to power and rose as the financial and intellectual backers of new culture of the colonies,” Wilder says.

Source and see full transcript:
http://www.democracynow.org/2013/11/29/ebony_and_ivy_the_secret_history