Dr. Cheyenne Bryant – Mental Detox

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Got my book in the mail about a week ago and am already on Chapter 4. This extraordinary woman has accomplished so much and is sure to keep climbing the ladder of success throughout her career.

I know this book will put me in a better place – state of mind – physically & spiritually. If you’ve dealt with poisonous negative thoughts, experienced traumatizing events or just enjoy learning new ways to lead a healthy mindful life, this book can help you.

About The Author

Cheyenne Bryant is an experienced Life Coach. For years she has shared her wisdom, awareness, and insight through lectures and assisting individuals with life impairments and challenges. Cheyenne embarked on a similar journey as the one you are undertaking, assisted by Iyanla Vanzant, Marianne Williamson, and many others. It wasn’t until she began healing others, that she began to heal herself. You see, healing is transparent. God works through transparency. What God moves through you, God gives to you! On a professional level Cheyenne has had the privilege of working with John Travolta, Anthony Hopkins, Mel Gibson, Chaka Khan, Adam Levine, Mario Lopez, Jessica Simpson, Robin Thicke, Phil Ivey, Simon Fuller, Jamaal Jackson, Behati Prinsloo, Andrew Nikou, Bishop Noel Jones, Greys Anatomy, American Idol, Ellen Degeneres, Weight Watchers, Entertainment One, CBS, Hollywood Husbands, TV Guide, and many others!

Order Now at: http://www.mentaldetoxbook.com

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome – Dr Joy de Gruy Leary

The Sojourner Truth show (Margaret Prescod) on http://www.kpfk.org covered Dr. Joy de Gruy Leary and this discussion which is a fundamental part of our history, present and future. Not only black people, but whites have been affected and infected as Dr. de Gruy states with slavery in the United States.

This discussion touches deeply the direct and indirect trauma African chattel slavery has had on our generations. How do we, how can we ‘completely’ be made free of the remnants of post-traumatic slavery syndrome?

First key is Self Love – Black people must love themselves, ourselves before anyone else could open their hearts & minds to our sole being.

Second key is Education – The clouded history taught in American classrooms are full of lies with so many gaps in the people that made this country.

Third key is Acknowledgement – To no longer mask the truth about the lives which were forced upon these lands along with the lives taken. The lives which set the soil, the lives which built the railroads, the lives which fed the said ‘settlers’ who are truly terrorists children, the lives which kept homes clean, the lives forgotten.

Those are a few things if were practiced could help in bringing a conscious to America – to help in removing the facade this country has been existing under for centuries.

Women – Me – My Sistas – Feminism

“Visionary feminism is a wise and loving politics. It is rooted in the love of male and female being, refusing to privilege one over the other. The soul of feminist politics is the commitment to ending patriarchal domination of women and men, girls and boys. Love cannot exist in any relationship that is based on domination and coercion. Males cannot love themselves in patriarchal culture if their very self-definition relies on submission to patriarchal rules. When men embrace feminist thinking and preactice, which emphasizes the value of mutual growth and self-actualization in all relationships, their emotional well-being will be enhanced. A genuine feminist politics always brings us from bondage to freedom, from lovelessness to loving.”
– Bell Hooks

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Video

Ebony and Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America’s Elite Colleges

The new book 10 years in the making, that examines how many major U.S. universities — Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Dartmouth, Rutgers, Williams and the University of North Carolina, among others — are drenched in the sweat, and sometimes the blood, of Africans brought to the United States as slaves. In “Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology American history professor Craig Steven Wilder reveals how the slave economy and higher education grew up together. “When you think about the colonial world, until the American Revolution, there is only one college in the South, William & Mary … The other eight colleges were all Northern schools, and they’re actually located in key sites, for the most part, of the merchant economy where the slave traders had come to power and rose as the financial and intellectual backers of new culture of the colonies,” Wilder says.

Source and see full transcript:
http://www.democracynow.org/2013/11/29/ebony_and_ivy_the_secret_history

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Black Star Crescent Moon book by Sohail Daulatzai

Black Star Crescent Moon book by Sohail Daulatzai

Had the once again pleasure of hearing Sohail Daulatzai (My sister’s old Professor of African American and Film & Media studies at UC Irvine, Ca) at his book signing at Eso Won Books in Leimert Park. He is one of the most well versed, intelligent, personable, accomplished scholar I have came across.

No wonder my sister loved being a student of his! His new book Black Star Crescent Moon, The Muslim International and Black Freedom beyond American just released & is deep look into this political & cultural history of Black Islam, Black radicalism, and the Muslim third world.

In 1962, Malcolm X said “the same rebellion, the same impatience, the same anger that exists in the hearts of the dark people in Africa and Asia, is existing in the hearts and minds of 20 million black people in this country who have been just thoroughly colonized as the people in Africa and Asia.” Fifty years later, in 2012, with a Black President who’s middle name is Hussein as the face of American empire, Muslim hip-hop artists such as Yaslin Bey (aka Mos Def) and Lupe Fiasco have continued to carry on Malcolm’s legacy of Black internationalism in their music, connecting white supremacy/racism in the U.S. with American war abroad against Muslims and other non-white peoples in a post-9/11 world.

As Sohail Daulatzai reveals in Black Star,Crescent Moon, Islam and the struggles in the Muslim Third World have played a central role in shaping the Black radical imagination throughout the 20th century and the global struggle against imperialism. Whether it be through Malcolm X or Muhammad Ali, the poets of the Black Arts Movement or jazz musicians, Black Power activists or filmmakers, novelists or hip-hop artists, Daulatzai tells the story of how Black artists and activists linked discontent and unrest in Harlem, Los Angeles and Chicago to the anti-imperialist movements of the Muslim Third World for inspiration and solidarity in their struggles for social justice.

By resurrecting a past when the national liberation struggles in the Muslim Third World occupied a central place within the Black radical imagination, Black Star, Crescent Moon explores explores the significance of this forgotten history for contemporary politics and arts when Black artists and activists imagined themselves not as national minorities but as a part of a global majority.

Reviews by Yasiin Bey (formerly Mos def), Michael E. Dyson & Robin D. G. Kelley