LAPD SHOOTS MULTIPLE TIMES – KILLING AN UNARMED HOMELESS MAN

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This morning in Los Angeles on skid row, LAPD tasered, shot and killed homeless man.

KTLA5 reports: Officers were dispatched to the area of East Sixth Street and South San Pedro Street (map) about 11:36 a.m. after a report of an altercation between two people, said Officer Jack Richter, spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Department.

After the officers arrived a struggle ensued, during which police tazed a man, the LAPD said. The man was then shot by police, the department said. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

See the full video of the incident here: https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=468584923295075&fref=nf

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Candles are seen at the memorial of Garner in Staten Island

The funeral was held in New York City for Eric Garner, an African-American father of six who died after police placed him in a chokehold. Police say they confronted Garner because he was selling bootleg cigarettes. Graphic video of the incident shows an officer pulling Garner to the ground by the neck and then holding his head against the pavement. As other officers crowd on top of Garner, he repeatedly says, “I can’t breathe.” Garner soon stops moving. He was pronounced dead at a local hospital. On Wednesday, Bishop Kareem Evans addressed mourners at Brooklyn’s Bethel Baptist Church.

“This is an awesome task because Brother Eric is not only a friend, but he is family. Not only is he family, but he is one that you consider close family.”

The officer who used the chokehold, Daniel Pantaleo, has been moved to desk duty and ordered to turn in his badge and gun pending investigations. Three men have sued Pantaleo in the past two years for unlawful, racially motivated arrests. The New York City Police Department says it also plans to overhaul training procedures in the wake of Garner’s death. Four emergency response workers who were at the scene have been suspended without pay.

See the video of Eric Garner and NYPD here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-5UY9I1EbU

And more Democracy headlines at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dS9A_WI3OT4&list=PL50BDB9BCCFAF09CA

Migrant Children’s Plight

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The House Judiciary Committee’s June 25 hearing was supposed to be about the recent surge in the numbers of unaccompanied child migrants from Central America who are arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border. Had this really been the subject of the hearing, the topic of escalating gang violence in Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador would have been front and center—as would the issue of how best to help children who have been seriously traumatized by both their journeys and conditions in their home countries. Yet, thanks to some who sit on the committee and those seated at the witness table, getting at the heart of these matters was like pulling teeth.

It was also telling that, behind the witness table, only one person—Rev. Mark J. Seitz, Bishop of the Diocese of El Paso—returned the discussion to the point where it should have been all along. He talked about the violence and terror fomented in Central American cities by gangs. He described how parents make an agonizing decision to place their children in the hands of a smuggler, and subject them to a possibly fatal journey northward, because that is the best choice among terrible alternatives. He said that unaccompanied minors apprehended at the border should be placed in child-friendly shelters as quickly as possible, and should be appointed both legal counsel and case workers.
* ARTICLE SOURCE: http://immigrationimpact.com/2014/06/26/congress-needs-reminding-of-unaccompanied-migrant-childrens-plight/

Listen to Mumia Abu Jamal’s commentary on this issue:
http://uprisingradio.org/home/2014/07/15/mumia-abu-jamal-when-children-are-the-enemy/

Nearly 60,000 children mostly from Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala have arrived in the US since last October. Many of them are being held in facilities as President Obama and the governors of border states struggle to find a politically acceptable solution.

A close look into the reason why these children take this long and dangerous journey is written in the book “Enrique’s Journey” by Sonia Nazario, based on a series of prize winning reports she wrote for the LA Times. Enrique’s Journey has been published in eight languages and has been adopted by 54 universities and scores of high schools nationwide.

The people of Murrieta, Ca and other places, white America – are fighting to keep these children and their parents out of this country in the only way they know how to – through racism. It is quite pitiful to see that these descendants of Europe who’s ancestor’s were the true terrorists of this land and others beyond, think this is their land… Go back to your homeland white man I say to those who know not how to live amongst the natives of this country.

SEE DEMOCRACY NOW: U.S. Turns Back on Child Migrants After Its Policies in Guatemala, Honduras Sowed Seeds of Crisis @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wRdj9nj1lw

Video

Displaced New Orleans Poet Sunni Patterson: I WIll Bring a Light to Every Injustice

Poet and performer Sunni Patterson gives another beautiful piece which sheds light to this country and land’s beyond façade.

We have not always found comfort in killers.
We have not always found solace being rocked
in the bosoms of those who silently pray
and openly destroy.
No, not always have we mistaken mimicry for mastery
or pretending for knowing
or enslavement for freedom.
But across my memory —-
across my memory marches millions -—
bold, regal, resilient, confident —-
unshackled feet stumping up spirits
to guide us through this fickle material world.
We like sun and moon folk,
universal souls praying our prayers,
singing our songs.
Eshu, Ogoun, Shango, Yemaja, Oshun, Obatala, Oya,
Damballah, Ayida Wedo, Loa, Nkongo, Olodumare and Yami.
We know all of you by name.
We are people of beginnings, of culture, of strength.
Not always have we given into the empty threats
and scare tactics of the powerless ones.
Not always have we allowed the blood of our sons and daughters
to color the streets while we’re walking asleep,
marching to the beat of that siren song.
They’re still wearing their sheets,
with nooses in reach,
showing their teeth and smiling, it seems.
But I hear in the breeze
in the rustle of the trees
and the dangling of the feet,
they say, please, don’t let them ever forget.
You see, not always have we suffered from amnesia.
Not always have we forgotten how to conjure up spirits,
ancestor wisdom,
fix up a mixture,
spiritual elixir,
ancient traditions.
We, like magicians,
god-like vision, we -—
we are people of sight.
So, no, not always have we fallen
for this okie doke
or inhaled the hazardous smoke of the manipulators
or been satisfied with crumbs for meals
our hands have prepared.
Hughes said life for us ain’t been no crystal stair,
but at least the steps are there
to push us up higher,
teach us how to go beyond the destroyer’s disguises,
look them in the eyes and be able to see.
Because what’s surprising when you know the nature of a beast
and especially when they’ve shown the same face for centuries?
So you tell me,
what’s the difference between two sisters in New Orleans
shot point-blank in the back of the head,
and two women bound in their car in Baghdad?
Or government-sanctioned killings in Kenya,
and a sister held hostage in a house in Virginia?
Or poverty in Haiti, poverty in Jamaica,
rape in Rwanda or rape in Somalia?
A sweatshop in China or one in Guatemala?
Or small pox and blankets, syphilis and Tuskegee,
formaldehyde and FEMA, ethnic cleansing and Katrina?
I recall within a speech Dr. King made us aware,
he said injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere.
So they can spare us their drama, huh?
We got the heart of them field working mamas.
We carry the torch of that ancestor fire.
So with every fiber that flutters in our being,
with every find that comes from our seeking,
with every hearing that comes from our listening,
and every sight that comes from our seeing,
we must be faithful, strategic, victorious and free.