David Banner: We’re Breeding a Generation of Spineless Zombies

Speaking the real*

Europeans / white people have “colonized” (brought upon terror, murdered, raped and occupied) all lands across the world. The things that are Black, the many things we have created has been stolen by whites for their own personal and monetary gains.

Don’t let media / capitalism poison you and your children’s minds for the conquering by those who’s ancestors and down the bloodlines created a country / world governed by evil.

Yasiin Bey on Malcolm X, for “Return of the Mecca: The Art of Islam and Hip-Hop”

Short interview by a professor I know from University of Irvine in Southern California with the one and only Yasiin Bey.

Topic: Malcolm X – R.I.P. to one of our great ones.

Recorded in Paris, this short for the exhibit “Return of the Mecca: The Art of Islam and Hip-Hop” features excerpts from an interview between Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) and curator Sohail Daulatzai, as well as music by Oddisee, and art work from the exhibit which includes Jamel Shabazz, Ernie Paniccioli, B+, Cognito, Katina Parker, Coleman, Nema Etebar and more.

See more at http://www.returnofthemecca.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Day – A Tribute

DemocracyNow shows a speech heard by few.

The United States government murdered him, but his legacy will never be forgotten along with all the other Black names unspoken in the struggles of racist oppression. Civil rights has been a never ending fight for laws that still hold Blacks in shackles.

R.I.P. to one of great ones.

Glory

Golden Globe for Best Original Song was presented to Common and John Legend for their collaboration “Glory” from the movie Selma.

Common’s acceptance speech referencing civil rights, protests against police brutality, and racial injustice that was this award’s show focal point. As he accepted his Golden Globe, Common stated:

“The first day I stepped on the set of Selma, I began to feel like this was bigger than a movie. As I got to know the people of the Civil Rights Movement, I realized I am the hopeful black woman who was denied her right to vote. I am the caring white supporter who was killed on the front lines of freedom. I am the unarmed black kid who maybe needed a hand but instead was given a bullet. I am the two fallen police officers, murdered in the line of duty. ‘Selma’ has awakened my humanity.”

Another Unarmed Young Black Man Killed by Pigs

ezellford
As protests continue in Missouri, police in Los Angeles are facing public anger over a shooting of another young African American man by the name of Ezell Ford. Details Family members say 25-year-old Ezell was unarmed and lying on the ground when police shot him dead Monday night. Ford suffered from mental disabilities.
According to the news station, Ezell Ford, 25, was only blocks from his South Los Angeles home Monday when officers stopped him. Police claim that it was an “investigative stop” but have not stated why Ford was being investigated. According to police, a struggle ensued and police “opened fire,” indicates a Los Angeles Police Department news release issued Tuesday and viewed by the news station.

His family has announced a federal civil rights lawsuit against the Los Angeles Police Department. A protest on LAPD headquarters has been called for this Sunday.

Video

“A Peace Warrior”: Poet, Civil Rights Activist Maya Angelou Remembered by Sonia Sanchez

On the Pulse of Morning

A Rock, A River, A Tree
Hosts to species long since departed,
Marked the mastodon.

The dinosaur, who left dry tokens
Of their sojourn here
On our planet floor,
Any broad alarm of their hastening doom
Is lost in the gloom of dust and ages.

But today, the Rock cries out to us, clearly, forcefully,
Come, you may stand upon my
Back and face your distant destiny,
But seek no haven in my shadow.

I will give you no more hiding place down here.

You, created only a little lower than
The angels, have crouched too long in
The bruising darkness,
Have lain too long
Face down in ignorance.

Your mouths spilling words
Armed for slaughter.

The Rock cries out today, you may stand on me,
But do not hide your face.

Across the wall of the world,
A River sings a beautiful song,
Come rest here by my side.

Each of you a bordered country,
Delicate and strangely made proud,
Yet thrusting perpetually under siege.

Your armed struggles for profit
Have left collars of waste upon
My shore, currents of debris upon my breast.

Yet, today I call you to my riverside,
If you will study war no more. Come,

Clad in peace and I will sing the songs
The Creator gave to me when I and the
Tree and the stone were one.

Before cynicism was a bloody sear across your
Brow and when you yet knew you still
Knew nothing.

The River sings and sings on.

There is a true yearning to respond to
The singing River and the wise Rock.

So say the Asian, the Hispanic, the Jew
The African and Native American, the Sioux,
The Catholic, the Muslim, the French, the Greek
The Irish, the Rabbi, the Priest, the Sheikh,
The Gay, the Straight, the Preacher,
The privileged, the homeless, the Teacher.
They hear. They all hear
The speaking of the Tree.

Today, the first and last of every Tree
Speaks to humankind. Come to me, here beside the River.

Plant yourself beside me, here beside the River.

Each of you, descendant of some passed
On traveller, has been paid for.

You, who gave me my first name, you
Pawnee, Apache and Seneca, you
Cherokee Nation, who rested with me, then
Forced on bloody feet, left me to the employment of
Other seekers – desperate for gain,
Starving for gold.

You, the Turk, the Swede, the German, the Scot …
You the Ashanti, the Yoruba, the Kru, bought
Sold, stolen, arriving on a nightmare
Praying for a dream.

Here, root yourselves beside me.

I am the Tree planted by the River,
Which will not be moved.

I, the Rock, I the River, I the Tree I am yours – your Passages have been paid.

Lift up your faces, you have a piercing need
For this bright morning dawning for you.

History, despite its wrenching pain,
Cannot be unlived, and if faced
With courage, need not be lived again.

Lift up your eyes upon
The day breaking for you.

Give birth again
To the dream.

Women, children, men,
Take it into the palms of your hands.

Mold it into the shape of your most
Private need. Sculpt it into
The image of your most public self.
Lift up your hearts
Each new hour holds new chances
For new beginnings.

Do not be wedded forever
To fear, yoked eternally
To brutishness.

The horizon leans forward,
Offering you space to place new steps of change.
Here, on the pulse of this fine day
You may have the courage
To look up and out upon me, the
Rock, the River, the Tree, your country.

No less to Midas than the mendicant.

No less to you now than the mastodon then.

Here on the pulse of this new day
You may have the grace to look up and out
And into your sister’s eyes, into
Your brother’s face, your country
And say simply
Very simply
With hope
Good morning.

http://www.democracynow.org/2014/5/29/a_peace_warrior_poet_civil_rights

Video

Senate Race-Baiting? Dems Join GOP to Block Obama DOJ Pick Tied to Legal Defense of Mumia Abu-Jamal

In a stunning vote, a group of U.S. Senate Democrats has broken ranks to join Republicans in rejecting President Obama’s pick to head the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, Debo Adegbile. The confirmation fight focused almost solely on Adegbile’s role in the legal defense of imprisoned Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal, who was convicted of killing a Philadelphia police officer, despite Abu-Jamal’s longstanding position of being not guilty. Adegbile was part of a team of lawyers at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund who successfully argued the trial judge’s jury instructions violated Abu-Jamal’s rights. Adegbile’s supporters say the attacks on him mark a new form of Willie Horton politics and race baiting. We discuss the controversy with two guests: Johanna Fernández, professor of history at Baruch College-CUNY and a coordinator with the Campaign to Bring Mumia Home, and Ryan Haygood, director of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s Political Participation Group.

Source:
http://www.democracynow.org/2014/3/6/senate_race_baiting_dems_joins_gop

Video

Freedom Summer: How Civil Rights Activists Braved Violence to Challenge Racism in 1964 Mississippi

Source: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/23/freedom_summer_how_civil_rights_activists

Hundreds of people marched in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on Wednesday to mark the 50th anniversary of Freedom Day. On Jan. 22, 1964, Fannie Lou Hamer and other civil rights activists marched around the Forrest County Courthouse in support of black voting rights. The rally was the beginning of a historic year in Mississippi. Months later civil rights groups launched Freedom Summer. More than 1,000 out-of-state volunteers traveled to Mississippi to help register voters and set up what they called, “Freedom Schools.” Out of Freedom Summer grew the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party that challenged the legitimacy of the white-only Mississippi Democratic Party at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. The period also saw the murders of three civil rights activists — Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney. Events are being held across Mississippi in 2014 to mark the 50th anniversary of this historic year. Stanley Nelson, director of the new documentary, “Freedom Summer.” An Emmy Award-winning MacArthur Genius fellow, Nelson’s past films include “Freedom Riders” and “The Murder of Emmett Till.”