Yasiin Bey on Malcolm X, for “Return of the Mecca: The Art of Islam and Hip-Hop”

Short interview by a professor I know from University of Irvine in Southern California with the one and only Yasiin Bey.

Topic: Malcolm X – R.I.P. to one of our great ones.

Recorded in Paris, this short for the exhibit “Return of the Mecca: The Art of Islam and Hip-Hop” features excerpts from an interview between Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) and curator Sohail Daulatzai, as well as music by Oddisee, and art work from the exhibit which includes Jamel Shabazz, Ernie Paniccioli, B+, Cognito, Katina Parker, Coleman, Nema Etebar and more.

See more at http://www.returnofthemecca.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Day – A Tribute

DemocracyNow shows a speech heard by few.

The United States government murdered him, but his legacy will never be forgotten along with all the other Black names unspoken in the struggles of racist oppression. Civil rights has been a never ending fight for laws that still hold Blacks in shackles.

R.I.P. to one of great ones.

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Black Panther Co-Founder Bobby Seale at SJSU speaking on social change

Leader of the Black Power movement….

EVENT:
Bobby Seale is the founding chairman and national organizer for the Black Panther Party in the 1960s and ’70s, which he and Huey P. Newton formed as a response to the police brutality in Oakland’s poor Black communities. Commemorating the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, he will share his insights on his experience with social movements then and his thoughts on social movements now, especially in light of the recent verdict of the Trayvon Martin case, attacks on ethnic studies programs and the minimum wage victory led by students and workers in San José.

Thursday, August 29th, 2013
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Ron Barrett Ballroom, Student Union
San Jose State University
One Washington Square
San José, CA 95192-0155

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Angela Davis – Women, Race & Class

Angela Davis - Women, Race & Class

Book of the Week!

If and when a historian sets the record straight on the experiences of enslaved Black women, she (or he) will have performed an inestimable service. It is not for the sake of historical accuracy alone that such a study should be conducted, for lessons can be gleaned from the slave era which will shed light upon Black women’s and all women’s current battle for emancipation.

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Lupe Fiasco: Solely for the Soul

This is an example of a great black man who is constantly progressing in his quest for attainable knowledge.

Lupe Fiasco is one of our great artists who should be looked upon by our young black boys and men. He is a teacher in the language of our culture, our history, our present day and our future.

Former Black Panther Assata Shakur Added to FBI’s Most Wanted Terrorist List

Assata ShakurAssata Shakur, who was born Joanne Chesimard, was a member of the Black Panther Party and Black Liberation Army. She was convicted in the May 2, 1973 killing of a New Jersey police officer during a shoot-out that left one of her fellow activists dead. She was shot twice by police during the incident. In 1979, she managed to escape from jail. Shakur fled to Cuba where she received political asylum. She once wrote, “I am a 20th century escaped slave. Because of government persecution, I was left with no other choice than to flee from the political repression, racism and violence that dominate the U.S. government’s policy towards people of color.”
Source: http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2013/5/2/ex_black_panther_assata_shakur_added_to_fbis_most_wanted_terrorist_list

An article on http://usnews.nbcnews.com starts off by stating:

The FBI put a woman on its list of most wanted terrorists for the first time Thursday — a 1970s black radical who authorities say shot a New Jersey trooper, made a daring daylight escape from prison and fled to Cuba.
By Erin McClam, Staff Writer, NBC News

The tone in which mainstream news, and let’s just be frank, right wing conservatives assert when speaking of the non-white, progressive and poor is unsettling. But, there stands the history of this country and others abroad when it comes to politics and social relationships, or lack thee of.

Now, I am not saying being a radical is a bad thing. The conscious ones out there know that for a change, there needs to be radicalism because the world has not and willnot change by asking nicely. The US was built on the back of slaves, and not just blacks (See: http://ssclinguafranca.wordpress.com/2011/12/08/the-other-slavery-chinese-coolies-in-latin-america/).

For a black man or woman who grew up with blunt racism, to be aggressively addressed by any officer of the law, that to this day uses tactics to kill and imprison our people, is a threat. To stand your ground and defend is the only action to be taken.

I stand with Assata Shakur as a black conscious woman and hope she dies of old age in a paradise untouchable by this country called the United States.

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“Long Distance Revolutionary”: Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Journey From Black Panther to Prison Journalist

Mumia Abu-Jamal is currently serving a life sentence for the alleged murder of a Philadelphia police officer in 1981. Considered by many to be a “political prisoner,” Abu-Jamal was originally sentenced to death; his case was appealed in 2011 and his sentence was commuted to life in prison. He continues his efforts to get a new trial, arguing that his original trial was rife with judicial and prosecutorial error and misconduct.

In December of 1981, Abu-Jamal was working as a radio journalist during the day and driving a cab at night. On the night of December 9, he witnessed Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner in an altercation with a Black motorist. Abu-Jamal recognized the motorist as his own brother and left his cab to intervene. What happened next has been disputed for the last 30 years.

The prosecution argues that Mumia Abu-Jamal, armed with a hatred of police since his days as a member of the Black Panther Party, shot Officer Faulkner several times, killing him. Before he died, according to the prosecutor, Faulkner was able to shoot Mumia once in the stomach.

Mumia maintains that not only did he not shoot Faulkner, but that the Philadelphia police department decided to frame him for the murder as payback for his years of reporting on their brutality against Blacks in the city. No gunshot residue was found on Mumia’s hand; no search was undertaken to find the motorist (Mumia’s brother) who was involved in the altercation with Faulkner; and several witnesses who originally testified that they had seen Mumia shoot Faulkner later recanted their testimony, saying that they had been pressured by Philadelphia police to implicate Mumia.

Long Distance Revolutionary: A Journey with Mumia Abu-Jamal is not the first film on Abu-Jamal however, this one is different; this film does not examine his case but rather, it looks at his life as a writer and revolutionary – from joining the Black Panther Party for Self Defense as a teenager through becoming a celebrated author of eight books while on Pennsylvania’s death row.

The film, written and directed by Stephen Vittoria of Los Angeles-based Street Legal Cinema, features Cornel West, Alice Walker, Angela Davis, Rubin Hurricane Carter, Dick Gregory, Peter Coyote, Ruby Dee, M-1 from the Hip Hop group Dead Prez, and a host of others.

Angelo & SoCal residents –– come out THIS WEEKEND to see Long Distance Revolutionary. Playing March 1-7, four showings a day: 12:30 / 4:00 / 7:00 / 10:00

TICKETS: http://www.laemmle.com/viewtheatre.php?date=03012013&thid=4

http://www.prisonradio.org/