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Danny Glover & Kathleen Cleaver on “Black Power Mixtape”

Based on the film with the same name, the extraordinary new book “The Black Power Mixtape” chronicles the black freedom movement in the United States using found footage of top African-American leaders between 1967 and 1975. Shot by Swedish journalists and discovered in the basement of Swedish public television 30 years later, the film features some of the leading figures of the Black Power movement in the United States, including Stokely Carmichael, Bobby Seale, Huey P. Newton, Angela Davis and Eldridge Cleaver. Renowned American actor, film director and political activist, Danny Glover; and Kathleen Cleaver, professor at Emory Law School, who is featured in the film during her stint as communications secretary of the Black Panther Party, talk about the film.

I saw this film at http://www.laemmle.com/ in Los Angeles, purchased the DVD when made available and I try to make as many friends watch it as possible. It is a must see, it is an eye opener, it is my history. These people featured in the film along w| many other names unknown made it possible for my sister, brothers and I to have careers, go to school, sit down in restaurants and much more. We owe much homage to them.

See the Democracy Now video clip here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZIzby9F6eY
Be sure to also visit https://www.freespeech.org/ and http://www.democracynow.org

The author, activist, and intellectual Angela Y. Davis is this year’s UC Regents Professor and Professor of History of Consciousness, an interdisciplinary PhD program, and Professor of Feminist Studies at University of California, Santa Cruz. The event is sponsored by the Gender Studies Department.
She will be giving a lecture titled “Feminism and Abolition: Extending the Dialogue”
at UCLA Los Angeles, Ca in the Royce Hall
Thursday May 8th, 2014
5:30pm to 7:00pm

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ngela Davis on Prison Abolition, the War on Drugs and Why Social Movements Shouldn’t Wait on Obama

ngela Davis on Prison Abolition, the War on Drugs and Why Social Movements Shouldn’t Wait on Obama

Via http://www.democracynow.org

For more than four decades, the world-renowned author, activist and scholar Angela Davis has been one of most influential activists and intellectuals in the United States. An icon of the 1970s black liberation movement, Davis’ work around issues of gender, race, class and prisons has influenced critical thought and social movements across several generations. She is a leading advocate for prison abolition, a position informed by her own experience as a fugitive on the FBI’s top 10 most wanted list more than 40 years ago. Davis, a professor emerita at University of California, Santa Cruz and the subject of the recent documentary, “Free Angela and All Political Prisoners,” joins us to discuss prison abolition, mass incarceration, the so-called war on drugs, International Women’s Day, and why President Obama’s second term should see a greater wave of activism than in his first.

 

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Angela Davis – Women, Race & Class

Angela Davis - Women, Race & Class

Book of the Week!

If and when a historian sets the record straight on the experiences of enslaved Black women, she (or he) will have performed an inestimable service. It is not for the sake of historical accuracy alone that such a study should be conducted, for lessons can be gleaned from the slave era which will shed light upon Black women’s and all women’s current battle for emancipation.