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Bill Moyers on Dark Money, the Attack on Voting Rights & How Racism Stills Drives Our Politics

In 2013, more than 1,000 people were arrested in North Carolina taking part in a series of protests called “Moral Mondays.” For 13 weeks, demonstrators rallied in the state capital of Raleigh to fight moves by Republican lawmakers to attack voting rights, education, the environment, healthcare and women’s rights. Now organizers are planning their largest protest yet — the Moral March on Raleigh, scheduled for February 8. The protests in North Carolina are the focus of a recent special on Bill Moyers’ show “Moyers & Company.” The documentary, “State of Conflict: North Carolina,” reveals how untraceable political donations called “dark money” have pushed North Carolina far to the right politically and how citizen protesters are fighting back.

Source: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/27/state_of_conflict_bill_moyers_on

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Hip Hop Highlight

Hip Hop Highlight

California birthed Hip Hop artist Chris Ness is on a relentless journey to what most may simply call stardom. But to him, it is more than just the bright lights and money. His music, the yearning to be heard my the masses is more of a spiritual quest.

Chris Ness gives you conscious music, fun music, storytelling music and more…. He is forever evolving.

New EP coming soon on iTunes with visuals on YouTube.

Music at: http://chrisness.bandcamp.com/

http://www.iamchrisness.com

Bookings: bookchrisness@gmail.com

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Through A Lens Darkly: How African Americans Use Photography to Shape Their Cultural Representation

Source: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/23/through_a_lens_darkly_how_african

A new film explores how African American communities have used the medium of photography to shape how they are represented. “Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of People” is directed and produced by Thomas Allen Harris, who shares his own family’s history in the film. Allen Harris is also the creator of the related project, the Digital Diaspora Family Road Show. Both were inspired in part by the book, “Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present” by Deborah Willis, who also produced the film. Allen Harris joins us from the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, where his movie is having its premiere.

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Freedom Summer: How Civil Rights Activists Braved Violence to Challenge Racism in 1964 Mississippi

Source: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/23/freedom_summer_how_civil_rights_activists

Hundreds of people marched in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on Wednesday to mark the 50th anniversary of Freedom Day. On Jan. 22, 1964, Fannie Lou Hamer and other civil rights activists marched around the Forrest County Courthouse in support of black voting rights. The rally was the beginning of a historic year in Mississippi. Months later civil rights groups launched Freedom Summer. More than 1,000 out-of-state volunteers traveled to Mississippi to help register voters and set up what they called, “Freedom Schools.” Out of Freedom Summer grew the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party that challenged the legitimacy of the white-only Mississippi Democratic Party at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. The period also saw the murders of three civil rights activists — Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney. Events are being held across Mississippi in 2014 to mark the 50th anniversary of this historic year. Stanley Nelson, director of the new documentary, “Freedom Summer.” An Emmy Award-winning MacArthur Genius fellow, Nelson’s past films include “Freedom Riders” and “The Murder of Emmett Till.”

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What the Death of Army Pfc. LaVena Johnson Says About Us (Warning – Graphic Material)

What the Death of Army Pfc. LaVena Johnson Says About Us (Warning – Graphic Material)

Blacks and women and are put on the side burner when it comes to this country’s so-called morality. Sad, but not shocking truth…. Not sure if mankind will fully ever be capable of an equal moral conduct.

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Amiri Baraka (1934-2014): Poet-Playwright-Activist Who Shaped Revolutionary Politics, Black Culture

R.I.P Amiri Baraka dies Thursday in New Jersey at the age of 79.

The life and legacy of Amiri Baraka, the poet, playwright and political organizer who died Thursday at the age of 79. Baraka was a leading force in the black arts movement of the 1960s and 1970s. In 1963 he published “Blues People: Negro Music in White America,” known as the first major history of black music to be written by an African American. A year later he published a collection of poetry titled “The Dead Lecturer” and won an Obie Award for his play, “Dutchman.” After the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965 he moved to Harlem and founded the Black Arts Repertory Theater. In the late 1960s, Baraka moved back to his hometown of Newark and began focusing more on political organizing, prompting the FBI to identify him as “the person who will probably emerge as the leader of the pan-African movement in the United States.” Baraka continued writing and performing poetry up until his hospitalization late last year, leaving behind a body of work that greatly influenced a younger generation of hip-hop artists and slam poets. We are joined by four of Baraka’s longtime comrades and friends: Sonia Sanchez, a renowned writer, poet, playwright and activist; Felipe Luciano, a poet, activist, journalist and writer who was an original member of the poetry and musical group The Last Poets; Komozi Woodard, a professor of history at Sarah Lawrence College and author of “A Nation Within a Nation: Amiri Baraka and Black Power Politics”; and Larry Hamm, chairman of the People’s Organization for Progress in Newark, New Jersey.

Source: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/10/amiri_baraka_1934_2014_poet_playwright

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Los Angeles County Sheriff Resigns After Deputy Arrests

Los Angeles County Sheriff Resigns After Deputy Arrests

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has announced his retirement one month after the arrests of 18 current and former deputies for the alleged abuse of prisoners and other offenses in local jails. Baca has served for nearly 50 years and had planned to seek re-election in June. But he now says he will step down at the end of the month. The charges followed a multi-year investigation into the systemic abuse of prisoners in Los Angeles County jails.

Source: http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/8/headlines#188